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KGNU Honors Its Finest

This is Dark Cloud on Wednesday, February 13, 2002.

Today’s Mouse’s birthday, I just discovered, and so I’m doing a last minute shift, because what I wrote for today isn’t appropriate. If that ain’t community radio, folks, I don’t know what is.

So for those of you unaware, Mouse is our Office Manager, has been since Hector was a pup. Hers has been a broad shoulder over the years to many here and we celebrate our fortune with her today. KGNU has been uncommonly lucky in staff over the years, but none more so than in Mouse Bradshaw. Happy Birthday, Mouse. Remember always.......I’m still younger than you.

So, have we all been thoroughly entranced by the Olympics, yet? I suppose I’m the only one who thinks the Canadian pairs ice dancers are a buncha goobers for their poor - shameful - sportsmanship. I have no clue whether or not the Russians were given a free ride - no clue - but I do know that we have been witness to some terrible Olympic decisions over the years, and I recall no fallout as bad as this. The United States basketball team losing in the seventies to the Soviets, an American boxer named Whitaker robbed a decade ago when his opponent couldn’t land a punch yet still took gold. The athletes didn’t throw such self-serving tantrums as the Canadians. Poor sports, both. Whitaker’s opponent on the medal podium pulled him up next to him in the gold level and held his hand aloft. That was class, and I’m sorry I do not recall the man’s name.

The Olympics, a corrupt organization thriving on graft and under the table deals, somehow put the spin out that they were honoring the victims of September 11 by parading our Shroud of Turin, the WTC flag at the opening ceremonies. As maudlin and borderline nauseating as it has become, the obverse was true: the flag brought dignity to the Salt Lake games, born in bribery, fraud, and deception as all Olympics are.

America has its best winter team ever, and it’s always exciting to see, but I wish it were live on television. It would be better left to the audience to videotape late events rather than pretend what we are watching is indeed ‘in progress.’ If we cared, we’d watch at three in the morning or whenever. In the Pleistocene of our separate youths, that’s what Mouse and I and all our generation did, and I’ll bet we thought it more exciting back then.